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Archive for the ‘Willow structures’ Category

Today we were back at Chorlton Water Park to continue work on the new wildlife garden being created here in conjunction with the RSPB.  We planted a few wildlife-friendly trees and shrubs and finished building a flowerbed mound where our plantings included flowers such as cowslip and ox-eye daisy.  We then helped finish the bog garden around the new pond – and added wetland plants such as marsh marigold, water avens, ragged robin and flowering rush.

It was good to see the willow arch (which we constructed in December) looking healthy and sprouting well, fulfilling its function as the entrance to this developing wildlife area!

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A day at Chorlton Water Park on Sunday 13th December marked the end of SACV’s activities for 2015.  We worked on maintaining the willow groynes at the edge of the lake, which provide an important habitat for birdlife and spawning fish; using the cut willow, we then created a willow arch which will provide a living entrance to the new wildlife garden being created in conjunction with the RSPB.  Then, to finish the day, we had our annual Christmas get-together with plenty of mulled wine and seasonal delights – all of that, plus a 40th birthday to celebrate!

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Well done to those hardy volunteers who were out yesterday at Chorlton Water Park, to continue last month’s task of the maintenance of willow groynes at the edge of the lake!  These groynes are important in protecting the lake’s banks from erosion and providing a wildlife habitat.  Despite the day getting gradually colder and wetter, with sleet for some of the time, a fair length of groyne was worked on.  After a brief lunch break the weather had turned pretty atrocious so there was a sprint finish to tidy up, keep warm and complete the last section!  A good effort by all.

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It was our first task of 2015 yesterday and we were back at Chorlton Water Park for the winter activity of maintaining the willow groynes at the edge of the lake.  A grey and blustery day, but dry – apart from the dabbling in the shallows of the lake!  Moving on from sections which have been worked on by us and others recently, we were again cutting some of the growth of recent years and weaving it back to build up the groyne.

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Today was a chilly January day, but nonetheless five volunteers and warden Richard turned out to paddle around at the edge of the lake in Chorlton Water Park and work on some of the willow groynes!  The groynes are intended to act as a living barrier, protecting the lake banks from erosion and providing a valuable wildlife habitat – as a fish refuge and as a site for nesting birds.  Many of the groynes have become very overgrown so work is needed to cut back the excess growth, with the cut willow then being used to re-weave and re-establish the groyne.

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